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Discriminatory to provide birth mothers same amount of top-up benefits as birth fathers, adoptive parents

Jurisdiction: - British Columbia
Sector: - Education

In a rare oral judgment that was issued on November 12, 2014 - British Columbia Teachers' Federation v. British Columbia Public School Employers' Association, 2014 SCC 70 - the Supreme Court of Canada overturned a decision by the BC Court of Appeal and restored the decision of a labour arbitrator concerning top-up benefits provided to teachers who are new parents.

The labour arbitrator, John B. Hall, had ruled that it was discriminatory - under section 15 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and section 13 of the BC Human Rights Code -  to provide the same amount of top-up benefits to birth mothers as birth fathers and adoptive parents.

Specifically, Arbitrator Hall had ruled:  read more »

Amendments to Canada Labour Code narrow employees' right to refuse work on basis it is unsafe

Jurisdiction: - Canada/Federal

Amendments to the Canada Labour Code - Part II that came into effect on October 28, 2014 are intended to narrow an employee's right to refuse work on basis it is not safe ((under sec. 128 of the Code).

For more information on these amendments, see  read more »

Class action lawsuit launched against Canadian Hockey League for breach of employment standards obligations

Ontario lawyer Ted Charney, Charney Lawyers, announced that he has filed a class action lawsuit against the Canadian Hockey League for breach of employment standards legislation as it relates to the junior hockey players who play in the league. This is his press release:

CHL CLASS ACTION LAUNCHED TORONTO, October 20, 2014 - A class action has been commenced on behalf of all players in the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), Western Hockey League (WHL), and the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) who entered into contracts with the teams in those leagues. It is alleged that the contracts with the players are employment contracts that contravene the minimum wage set by the legislation governing each jurisdiction where a team is domiciled.

The defendants are the Canadian Hockey League, the OHL, the WHL, the QMJHL, and the sixty teams that play in each of these leagues.  read more »